When grownups won’t build lemonade stands

On a recent visit home, I learned that I almost built a lemonade stand. My mother was telling a story to her friend, and indirectly informed me of an incident of which I had no memory. One afternoon, second- or third-grade Me approached the property manager of our apartment complex in a small Midwestern city and requested that he help Me construct a small lemonade stand. He later told my mother about my request and they chuckled. Mother and friend smiled at the story.

I, however, stared at my mother. First, I cross-checked the witness:

Me: “That really happened?”
Mother: “Yes.”

“And he didn’t build it?” This part of the story could have been the foundation for several more chapters to the story, and based on the blank expressions around me, I was the only one to notice.

My mother was not sure why a) he did not help build the lemonade stand, b) she didn’t backup my request, c) encourage me – or, more likely, allow me – to find an alternative solution.

I do not spend much time thinking about lemonade stands, though I hear them referenced frequently, including by politicians. Now that I know I was an aspiring lemonade entrepreneur, I thought about it, and I believe we can do better.

There may be individuals that insist and make it happen on their own: find a chair and a box, sneak some lemons and a pitcher out of mom’s kitchen, and get it done.  When she sees all the shiny quarters (revenue), it will assuage her rage over the fact that you were speaking to strangers (customers) without her knowledge, right?

Think bigger: how much better would it be if each child that expressed their first interest in doing something entrepreneurial received some encouragement and support to take a chance and try it out? Could we help each child unleash new levels of confidence and creativity by supporting this first experience in pursuing an idea?

The founder of Lemonade Day thinks we can. For four years, he works with city officials and business groups to register kids – with a parent, teacher or mentor – for a one-day event. The program provides a guide and a process that the kids and their supporting adults can follow to start their lemonade business. The program is in several states, and tens of thousands of kids have started their own stands. (More in this great Inc.com feature.)

Ashoka’s Youth Venture does not focus on lemonade stands, but it, too, is founded on the understanding that when we make a conscious effort to tell young people that they can launch their own venture to make a positive change in society, and we support them, this experience empowers them to dream and act even bigger in the future.

The lemonade stand is about kids, but it is also about adults. We can congratulate the lemonade stand owner, but we can also be attentive and ready to offer encouragement.

Note: Apparently, it may be a good idea for adult lemonade stand mentors to check in with the city clerk’s office in case there are laws that are not lemonade-friendly.

Image by New Diaspora. New Dialogue. illustration contributor.

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Destination Greece: Sun, Studies and Service

As summer approaches, some us are fortunate enough to look forward to a visit to Greece. There are several study abroad or learning opportunities for students that would like to learn about and experience Greece – both classical and modern Greece. Programs are increasingly incorporating elements of local volunteering and community service to help their students establish deeper connections with the local communities that welcome them for the summer. I highlighted some of the stories of young visiting volunteers and interviewed a couple Greek organizations that offer volunteering opportunities for Reinventing Greece.

Journey to Greece students prepare for their volunteer service with the 2010 Special Olympics.

Here is part of that story and the link to the full feature (which is the best part!).

Young people are volunteering while visiting or studying in Greece.

The next generation in the U.S. – young adults from adolescents to about 30 years of age, often referred to as the millenials – want to change the world. Young Americans of Hellenic descent are among them. There are young people from this country volunteering while visiting or studying in Greece. In the process, they are gaining new understandings of Greek society, establishing relationships with people in local communities, deepening their ties to their heritage, and learning important lessons about teamwork, community, leadership and citizen diplomacy.

U.S. millenials volunteer more than any previous generation, according to USA Today, and corporations have found that one of the best ways to attract this next generation as employees is to offer paid time-off to volunteer.

National leaders are recognizing that this desire to have an impact and change the world for the better extends beyond borders. In May 2011, The Next Generation Initiative participated in the Global Diaspora Forum, hosted by the State Department and other partners. We saw national leaders and donors of international programs recognizing and discussing the value of diaspora organizations in strengthening U.S. relations and partnerships with other countries in many fields. One areas of discussion was youth volunteering. Young people are seeking opportunities to go back to their countries of heritage, or other countries, to volunteer.

This trend is evident among Hellenic American youth. In a national student research study conducted by the Initiative in 2010, young Greek and Cypriot Americans overwhelmingly expressed an interest in traveling to Greece for volunteer, internship, study and work opportunities. Students and young professionals report that it is challenging to find information, in English, on community organizations and businesses that offer volunteer or partnership opportunities for diaspora youth.

To address this interest, The Next Generation Initiative would like to help its next Reinventing Greece student and young professional team find opportunities to join their peers in Greece and give back to local Greek communities.

Welcome to phase one in this effort: ask questions and learn.

We asked local non-government organizations (NGOs), community action groups, educational institutions and others about their volunteer programs and community service experiences to learn about opportunities for diaspora Greeks or friends of Greece to give back while they are visiting or studying in Greece. We found that study and travel abroad programs are increasingly incorporating service work in their programs. We are sharing some of their stories here.

As we search for opportunities for our team, we invite you to read about the initiatives we are discovering, and reach out to them to join their efforts if you will be visiting Greece this year. We also invite you to share more of your experiences with us and our readers in the comment section below.

See the stories of young volunteers and read interviews with Greek organizations that offer volunteering opportunities on Reinventing Greece:

https://www.hellenext.org/reinventing-greece/2012/05/destination-greece-sun-studies-and-service/

Discussion with an artist in Larissa: art in a hospital and art in a crisis

Melas Karagiannis is a Greek painter in Larissa, a city in central Greece. He recently produced some paintings for the radiology clinic at the Larissa University Hospital.  “I’m actually working there as a cook, because as a painter you can’t survive. Don’t try this at home,” he jokes.

Art can have specific purposes, and this is certainly the case in a hospital. As an artist, Melas says, “If you want to do something, I mean artistically, in a hospital, you should really think, ‘In that place there are people who are not well.’ It’s not a gallery, so you can’t put whatever you want, or whatever you like. There are people who are sick, are ill, and they want to get better, so you should really take care. Be careful of what you are going to produce.”

Cancer patients, their families, hospital staff and visitors all have access to the corridor lined with Melas’s paintings.

“You should talk to the people who are working in the hospital,” he advises. “You should get their advice so they can help you have a better result. That’s all.”

While working at the hospital, Melas wanted to do something for the clinic’s patients. The psychiatrist and psychologist working in the hospital clinic advised that the paintings include cool colors, like blue and green, and remain abstract – that is, without representations of people, animals or other objects. “It cools them down; they relax while they walk. They don’t just see a naked wall, they see something, but it’s nothing in particular. It’s great. The reactions are good. And I’m happy for that.”

Melas is a painter. He has several influences: “Salvador Dali, and also pop art, this kind of mixture…colors, strong colors. I’m trying to provoke in a way, the people around me, to show them something that will wake them up from their routine reality.”

He says that most people either like his work or hate it – which indicates that his work has an effect on people. “These are the reactions which I like – either love it or hate it – because it is very important. The people that are neutral…it means [the piece] didn’t touch them.”

“I’m working on several paintings now, because I can’t work on one. I’m just mixing colors and seeing the result, that’s all. If I don’t like it, I just put some more color on it until I like it, and it stays.  That’s the way it works.”

As an artist in Larissa, he is not alone. There are many creative people in Larissa, professional and amateur, producing art. They paint, sculpt and write.

“Sometimes I think that this city can’t really see what is going on, and it is unable to give all the artists a chance to show their work.”

According to Melas, the state should play a role in helping artists create and display their art. “This is the only way. Nobody else will [do this]. And the artists, by themselves, it’s not a matter of courage, it’s a matter of money, strictly. They can’t afford to pay to have shows.”

He acknowledges that the Greek state will not likely take on this role anytime soon given the economic crisis.

Yet art has an important role to play during this crisis. “To provoke. To wake up. There’s no other role now, it’s the times. Art now should wake up the people, should make them think ‘why’ when Greece is like this: why is the situation is like this, why are we like this. And to show them, every day art should be like a mirror. Around the misery which we are living. Nothing else. There’s no time for beautiful paintings, or flowers somewhere and sunsets. To provoke, nothing else. To wake them up. We ended up like this because we were sleeping. And it’s time to wake up.

When asked if he has any message for aspiring or working young artists in Greece, he says he cannot understand young artists in Greece.

“I understand that it is very difficult to live, just to survive, from art.  It is very easy to say, ‘I have to do what the people want me to do or paint, just to pay my rent.’

But the only message I can give them is: don’t give up. Do what you want to do. This is the only thing that is going to change the world. If you give up, nothing is going to change. It is going to stay the way it is. And you see the results; they are obvious. So don’t give up. And if the younger generations don’t give up, maybe a better future will come. If they give up, then for sure it’s going to be the same.”

Sounds like a message for more than just young artists. We’ll take it.

View some of Melas Karagiannis’s work on his website: http://www.melas-karagiannis.eu/

This is the first in a series of interviews from Larissa. Read the introduction here and stay tuned for the rest!

A global public art project allows local communities to be a part of their local art

This GOOD article describes how artist JR took his project to a global level, thanks to his vision and the 2011 TED prize. His InsideOut Project allows whole communities to be a part of local art.

Check out the Inside Out Project trailer, Episode 1, and other videos on the project’s YouTube channel.

In Greece, MELD | Athens invited six Greek photographers to lead a Group Action as part of this global art initiative. They created portraits of children from privileged and underprivileged backgrounds in Athens and posted them in side-by-side pairs in the city’s public spaces on October 15, 2011. This Eyes of Truth Group Action was a parallel event with the October 10, 2011 TEDxAcademy.

TEDxAcademy Talk by Corinne Weber, Creative Director & Producer of MELD and Yvonne Senouf, Creative Concepts Producer of MELD:

The Smile of the Child Needs Us.

In the fall of 2004, I spent the afternoon in one of the community houses of Hamogelo tou Paidou, or The Smile of the Child, a Greek non-profit that helps children when they are most in need. The founder of the organization knew the value of a child’s smile more than most of us ever could. Ten-year-old Andreas Yannopoulos, while suffering from terminal cancer, expressed with clarity his belief that all children, regardless of race or ethnicity, deserve to smile, and that if everybody came together, this could be accomplished.  Thus the organization was established in 1995 and began fulfilling Andreas’ vision.

After 16 years of growth and tens of thousands of children’s smiles, the organization is at risk of closing its doors in less than two months. The economic crisis is about to hit children who have already suffered abuse, neglect, abandonment, poverty, illness.

Six years ago, as the children played outside, the head of social services and the child and family counselor at the Kareas shelter discussed the organization’s latest activities in the free moments they had before they received a call to pick up a new child in need. I was with a member of the U.S. Embassy’s American Citizen Services section, which maintains contact with several Greek organizations offering services that could assist American citizens in Greece. The Smile of the Child is an invaluable resource in helping American children in cases where their parent or guardian is hospitalized or unable to care for them while in Greece.

With over 4,000 volunteers and teams of professional educators, counselors, psychologists, social psychologists, social workers and administrators, The Smile of the Child impacts the lives of thousands of children and families every year, and is one of the most trusted and recognized civil society organizations in Greece.

Since 1997, Smile of the Child has established 11 shelters housing 275 abused or neglected children, from infants to young adults, sent through court order.  Its 24/7 national emergency hotline, 1056, received 270,000 calls for help in 2010, including reports of abused or abandoned children. It also runs 116000, the European Hotline for Missing Children, in Greece. The website www.lostchild.gr reports and tracks the cases of missing children in Greece. The group also activates Amber Alert Hellas at the request of the police, runs outreach programs for homeless children in Thessaloniki and Athens, and maintains a fleet of eight ambulances for infants and children and vehicles to reach and transport children in emergencies.

Please help a very important organization maintain its services.  If you are in Greece, you can make a donation via phone or SMS.  If you are outside of Greece, you can make a donation online or through a bank deposit. Instructions here.

Celebrating and Promoting Volunteerism

“There isn’t a culture of volunteerism in Greece.”  This is a comment I have heard many times in casual conversations with fellow Greek Americans and non-Greeks that have spent long periods of time in Greece.  It is a comment I said on a few occasions in the past.  It may have been true at one time, but this is changing.  The number of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and youth volunteers has been growing in recent years. (See the “Legal Status of Volunteers in Europe” country report for Greece.) To some extent, programs and funding from the European Union helps facilitate this growth, though it is still the values, energy and dedication of the people that truly makes this possible.  Here’s a recent example, as well as a sign of things to come:

On June 5, over 60 organizations participated in the 9th annual Volunteering Festival in Thiseio in Athens.  The event, under the motto “Honor … By volunteering” included musical and theatrical performances, interactive games, dancing, and a flash mob that was all about hugs.  Organizations presented their work to visitors, informed them of how they can join their efforts and exchanged ideas with other organizations. The day ended with a concert by Magic de Spell.  And maybe there were more hugs. Visit the festival’s site for a list of participating organizations and sponsors, pictures of the event and a video from last year’s festival.

The 9th Annual Volunteering Festival Logo.

The volunteering festival was born in 2001, a year the UN proclaimed as the International Year of Volunteers.  That year, over 30 volunteer organizations came together, under the auspices of the Municipality of Athens, to organize a workshop on volunteering.

The theme of international organizations inspiring local or national action does not stop there.  The European Commission proclaimed 2011 the European Year of Volunteering and allocated 2 million euros for preparations in 2010 and 6 million euros for public awareness activities on in 2011.  In response, the General Secretariat of Youth is establishing a national steering committee to propose and implement an action plan to promote volunteerism. They invited the public to propose activities for 2011 identify best practices already implemented. Stay tuned here for updates.  I am looking forward to seeing what organizations contribute to the plan and how next year’s events turn out, so let’s hope for frequent updates.

The Next Generation of Greek Mythology

The six winners of the 2010 Democracy Video Challenge were recently announced.  The challenge:  create a short video that completes the phrase “Democracy is…”  The contest takes place every year and is open to submissions from all over the world.

A video from a junior high school in Athens made it as a semi-finalist. The video and its story are beautiful.  Therefore, I will let the video speak for itself.  Congratulations Glyca Nera Junior High!