Graffiti art and local dining: get out of the house

“An idea that began from our need for such a space…”

This is the message that greets visitors to the restaurant’s website (in Greek), and the reason that co-owners Giannis Petrou and Asterios Ganas created the concept for the locally-sourced food establishment that is Klimax (klee’-maks). This local business in the Greek city of Larissa celebrated two years this month. I sat down to speak with Giannis Petrou about his experience launching this small business, the graffiti mural he painted on a neglected wall across the street, and his perspective on food, art and public spaces. [Note: our discussion took place over a year ago, but it does not make his story and perspective any less interesting, or make me miss the place and the environment any less.]

“It’s been two years now that my partner, Asteris, and I have spent unbelievable funds, energy and time for this concept called Klimax,” says co-owner Giannis Petrou. The concept of Klimax is physically centered around a small self-service restaurant that sells locally produced food and wine, but it encompasses more. “It is not an establishment that sells wine, cheese and pasta. It is something different.”

Klimax is a place for people and community. “There is a great need today for people to go out on the streets and see that something is happening.” They need spaces to do this.

IMG_2366-Klimax2Klimax is situated along one of Larissa’s pedestrian paths, and directly across from the First Ancient Theater of Larissa (excavated recently, and dating to the 3rd century BC). “We waited for a shop to empty out in this part of town,” emphasizes Giannis, “and as soon as we found it, we rented it and fixed it.” In the evenings, seating expands from the little corner shop to either side of the pedestrian street, in a way that makes one wish it would continue along the entire length of the path. There are cushions for people to sit casually on the short wall along the railing that separates the path and the field of the ancient theater. It hosts live music, book presentations, local wine tastings. People meet friends, greet staff and friends as they pass by, make new introductions, comment on the jazz music playing.

On the other side of the railing, there is a large mural painted on the crumbling side wall of a building, which faces the ancient theater and looks down the length of the pedestrian path. This is Giannis’s work. I ask what inspires him. “I try to improve the image and, more broadly, my life and the lives of everyone around me, to try and improve what they see,” he says. “The wall we photographed that stands behind us was created for that very reason.”

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Giannis Petrou, co-owner of Klimax, discusses the mural he created across from the restaurant, and the importance of art in public spaces.

I sat all day in the business in the winter and I could see this wall. It was crumbling, neglected, and full of weeds – in the most beautiful point in the city. I thought it would be good to take the initiative to jump over the railing and do something secretly because if I were to seek a permit to use the wall, neither the Municipality of Larissa, nor the archaeological department would grant me the permit. I jumped the railing three Sundays in the early morning hours before dawn, I created [the mural] and then I gained the people’s congratulations, ‘good for you’s’, etc. And that’s my intention from here on, to be honest: to trespass into fields and create wall murals.”

“Beyond seeing an ugly wall that I could not stand to look at, I wanted to make something that someone would see and ask ‘what is he trying to say?’ For me this is more valuable. If I made this piece or any other piece and kept it at home or took it to a gallery, no more than 50-100 people would see it. But here I see that there is not a person that goes by all day that does not say, who did this?

For Giannis, the reaction of the people passing by is the best outcome of the mural. “People’s reaction was very warm… The most important thing is that the archaeological department embraced this, and they liked it a lot, and they left it there. And they want to keep it. I admit I was not expecting that. I expected them to tear it down, to destroy it.” To the contrary – they installed the spotlight.

The concept and story of Klimax is integrally linked to the location: “Despite our disappointments for two years that there was no available spot here at the ancient theater, we waited because we did not want to do at another place in the city. We wanted Klimax to be created here only.”

Climbing over obstacles and creating new something new
The name Klimax is from the ancient Greek word κλίμαξ/κλίμακα, meaning ladder. It was inspired from the Byzantine icon of The Ladder of Divine Ascent, or Ladder of Paradise, an ascetical treatise for monasticism in Eastern Christianity. “This work describes the 30 steps that we must all climb to be closer to God. All this – steps, God, etc – is in parentheses,” explains Giannis, “in the sense that we are not referring to a theocratic issue, but we try to overcome obstacles, ‘climb the rungs’ and create new things.”

“This is for us our great secret, and our ‘climb’ progresses daily. We search for new producers, look for new people who with small unit production, who do not have someone to support them and they produce a product. Meanwhile, we want this product and we provide it to customers. This happens every day. It is a piece of the city that concerns the people; they respect it and they support it….Not all of Larissa can understand this.

We simply created a place where we would want to go. That’s it. And because nobody had created it, we have done it now.”

People still ask Giannis and Asteris about their experience in setting up the business – how and why they did it.  “All the time. Every day.” Giannis smiles. If not for the restricted economy, he expects there would be several similar establishments in Larissa already. “To do this, we got funds from our own people: our wives, our mothers, our families, our siblings. They gave us whatever they had so we could create this establishment. This makes us feel great responsibility, but more so, when this goes well, it makes us more proud, because these people were proved right and we did not disappoint them. They gave us their money without asking us exactly what we wanted to do. We did not know exactly what it would look like. So when this goes well and progresses, it does justice to them.

“We wanted an establishment like this – me, Asteris, our wives – so we could go out, but it was missing from this city so we were forced to go to Athens.” To develop their idea of what they wanted this space to look like in Larissa, the business partners made several trips to cities across Europe to meet people with restaurants based on such a concept. “We went on around 15 trips to create just one spot in this city, in front of the ancient theater, where everyone can come, chat with friends, listen to beautiful music, drink a nice wine, and feel human. This is what we intended to do.”

“Our friends support this idea. We did not communicate the idea, because the two or three people we first told mocked us. They thought it was a given that a 30 square meter self-serve establishment across from the ancient theater would not last 2-3 months, it would go out of business immediately. After that we decided not to pay attention to those who had knowledge on the subject, the “experts”, but decided to do what we wanted.”

Art finds people, people find perspective
I ask if he wants to be more involved with painting and art, and he admits it was his childhood dream.“For me, to say that you exist and you are a painter and an artist is asceticism. You must work on it from morning till night and torture over a canvas…Unfortunately, I could not achieve this in my life. However, as you can see, I catch a few breaths, I sneak small opportunities, like this wall here, to exercise it.”

He chose to exercise this ‘small opportunity’ in a public space, so I ask him about the relationship between art and public spaces. “In my opinion, this is the point. Art must leave the «galleries». I worked for six years as an art director at the Larissa Museum of Modern Art, and… unfortunately, at all the openings that I recall, there were 50-60 people. This means what? That painting and art in general that is ‘shut away’ in galleries or museums in Greece unfortunately reaches very few. Art must provoke…it must stir people and get them out of the house, pull them out of their shell. This is the role of art around the world and across time.”

“[If] you cannot bring to people to the galleries and museums, what do you do? What Banksy did in London, what others did earlier in New York: provoke people in public spaces so that they become sensitized. Art does not wait for people to come to it; art goes to the people. For me, this is what it is all about and this is my purpose… I do not plan to create paintings [on canvasses] and put on a gallery show, it no longer interests me. When an opportunity presents itself, I will paint walls.

As you see, we can say all these things with many words, but it is very simple. To make a wall or an installation outside is nothing tremendous. Simply, you must have a goal of engaging as many people as you can.”

Giannis observes that a key consequence of constantly increasing sales taxes on consumer goods and consumption in the country is that people have less options for spending time with each other in public.  “People must go out, not necessarily to go to establishments, [but] to sit at the public squares, to speak, to mobilize.”

“I try to encourage young people who have an artistic vein to get out of the house and create something that will provoke people…For me there is a value in creating something that makes you stop and say ‘why did this person do this, what is this?’” Gianni nods at his mural on the wall behind us, to illustrate the point and bring it all back together – and local. “The man that climbs the ladder and sees the city from above, the paper dove that is at the top of the ladder, why is it there? Bring people into a process of reflection.”

This past year, Klimax opened another piece of the original Klimax concept: a garden, consisting of greenery, recovered materials, art and more seating.

Happy two-year anniversary and many more to Klimax, a space and place for community.

This is part of a series of interviews from Larissa. Read the introduction here and the first interview with artist Melas Karagiannis here.

Tour Klimax through this video.

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